Brown Rice is Fight Rice!

Ahh, brown rice… sounds boring, but if you’re into nutrition and feeding your fight machine, brown rice is actually pretty exciting. 
 

If you’re training to fight you need the complex carbs that rice provides,
but you can also benefit greatly by switching to brown.

 

Eating brown rice is kinda like eating potatoes with the skin on. Just like spuds, there’s the white, fluffy part on the inside and the brown, earthy layer on the outside. And just like the nutrient rich skin of a potato, the outer layer of rice - the bran and the germ of the rice grain - is where so much nutrition lies. White rice is what you get when you strip away the bran and germ from brown rice. And when you take away the brown outer layer of the rice grain you change it from a whole grain powerhouse to a basic starchy foodstuff. In fact, even “enriched” white rice, like what we have in the US, pales in comparison (pun intended) to it’s original unmodified state.

When rice is refined and converted from brown to white much of the beneficial nutrients are lost. One cup of cooked brown rice has about 25% more calories than white, but also 2 to 10 times the amount of minerals and vitamins. Brown rice is a rich source of fatty acids and minerals that help fight cancer, promote good cholesterol, and protect against inflammation and even arthritis. White rice is missing these. Eating brown rice regularly can help reduce the risk of diabetes, while eating white rice can actually increase your risk. And brown rice, unlike white rice, is full of fiber and is therefore great for losing fat, keeping the metabolism efficient and for helping to keep the system free of toxins.

Brown rice takes a bit longer to prepare and requires a little more water. The flavor is nutty and the texture is chewy, as opposed to the fluffy texture of white rice. The outer germ of the brown rice is oily and therefore can go rancid so it’s widely recommended to store brown rice in the fridge and to toss it after about 6 months.

The simple flavor and texture of white rice is a nice complement to so many dishes. White’s cousin, Brown, on the other hand, takes some taste acquiring, but the payoff is substantial. If you’re training to fight you need the complex carbs that rice provides, but you can also benefit greatly by switching to brown.

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Posted on October 23, 2014 .